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ACCUSED John Osipowicz

ACCUSED

John Osipowicz

Published January 28th 2014
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
322 pages
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 About the Book 

ACCUSED----------------------Mystery Novel------------------108,303 words“O brave new world,That has such people in’t. . .Let us not burden our remembrances,With a heaviness that’s gone.”----------The Tempest, Act V, Scene IWilliamMoreACCUSED----------------------Mystery Novel------------------108,303 words“O brave new world,That has such people in’t. . .Let us not burden our remembrances,With a heaviness that’s gone.”----------The Tempest, Act V, Scene IWilliam Shakespeare (1564-1616)A young boy, Richie Rebus, disappears on his way home from school. A year later he is found in a shallow grave.The person accused of the murder is familiar to Detective Jon Wellner. Twenty years earlier when Wellner himself was Richie’s age, he was followed home by that same man.So began Wellner’s trip back into time to confront the ghosts of his past. The trip begins to involve loved ones and new discoveries that Wellner is not prepared for. Diving headfirst into a case that he has no business investigating, Wellner begins to suspect that the accused killer, Abe Stark, did not kill Richie Rebus.Is this the truth, or is Wellner a victim of his own lingering childhood fears?This is the story of a man desperate to find the truth even if that truth could destroy him.Should the past remain buried?John Osipowicz was born in Madison, Wisconsin, and graduated (cum laude) from the University of Notre Dame. After college he worked in advertising for the Chicago Tribune, but then migrated into teaching mainly in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Currently he lives across from a horse farm, thirty miles west of Philly. He has a dog who died last year but still lives in his heart, and a cat so fat it’s been mistaken for a raccoon. His hobbies are whimsy and leisure. The key to writing, he feels, is the ability to construct the next sentence.Since retiring from teaching, he’s had the leisure to indulge his whimsy by writing murder mysteries. He attests to the fact that none of the victims in his stories were former difficult students.