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Mrs. Royalls Pennsylvania, Or, Travels Continued in the United States Volume 2 Anne Newport Royall

Mrs. Royalls Pennsylvania, Or, Travels Continued in the United States Volume 2

Anne Newport Royall

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230205458
Paperback
100 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... with its head erect, asMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ... with its head erect, as though it were looking earnestly at something, and though it was not an inch in length, it was perfect and entire, the ears, nose, and eyes were life itself. They have introduced a new fashion of stamping figures on the glass while it is warm, also moulding glass, which is done neatly in the same way metal is cast. I only visited Bakewells and Robertsons--Mr. Robertson pursues the same way, and also engraves. He had some very handsome specimens of purple glass, and seems to vie with Bakewell & Co. in industry and skill in manufac: toiy of white flint. But the quantity, variety, beauty and brilliancy of the endless piles of glass at Bakewells, is the greatest show I ever saw. Every thing made of glass is found here--and I would say, the patterns and clearness of the pieces, is equal, if not superior, to the Boston glass, ft cannot be exceeded--one of the men who workr ed formerly at the Cambridge glass house, informed me, it was much superior in transparency and Smoothness, but they did not make the pieces so thick as at Boston DEGREES to bear deeper cutting--herein, he said, the Boston glass excelled. It is impossible, however, to decide without comparing them both together--and the highest praise is alike due to both, and to say the least, both are anhojior to our country. manufactories, iz. Mi ssrs. MClurg, Freeman and MiU ier, one of the BakeweWs. Mr Gallagher, of one of the brass foundries, aud the Messrs. Pattersons, copper foundries, two tinners, Adams of the Phoenix Cotton factory, and H. Holdship, Esq. one of the most enterprising and wealthy men in Pittsburg, and amongst the most worthy of her citizens. Besides his extensive paper manufactory, already noticed in Pittsburjr, he has a large bookstore